Resources and Client Diffusion

Let's talk about some of the various Graphic Resources and methods of Client Diffusion one can utilize as a Graphic Designer, and how they can benefit you immensely.

As a Graphic Designer, I'm certain you're aware of how competitive the world of design is, and how you're constantly expected to expand your trade by delving into the modern expectations of design, and on-going trends. Whilst this may be true, did you know that there are a wide spectrum of tools and resources of which you can utilize as a Graphic Designer? Oh sure, there are resources like YouTube and Google, but are you aware of these other resources:

  • Canva is a free graphic-design tool website, founded in 2012. It uses a drag-and-drop format and provides access to over a million photographs, graphics, and fonts. It is used by non-designers as well as professionals. https://www.canva.com
  • Pixabay is an international website for sharing high quality public domain photos, illustrations, vector graphics, and film footage. As of November 2017, Pixabay offers over 1,188,454 free photos, and illustrations. https://www.pixabay.com
  • FakeClients is an online resource of which can be utilized by Graphic Designers to generate fake client briefs to practice logo design. https://fakeclients.com/
  • Photopea is an online photo editor of which supports .PSD (Adobe Photoshop, .XCF (GIMP), and Sketch formats (Sketch App). https://www.photopea.com
  • Adobe Stock Work Faster. Find the perfect image to enhance your next creative project. Preview watermarked images inside your designs first. Then license, access and manage them directly within Photoshop CC, InDesign CC, Illustrator CC, and other Adobe desktop apps. https://stock.adobe.com
  • Paint.NET is a freeware raster graphics editor program for Microsoft Windows, developed on the .NET Framework. https://www.getpaint.net/

Additionally, there are also various methods of which can be utilized to diffuse an irate client (or clients), the first method we will discuss is called "CARP".

  1. Control - The key in reasserting control is to behave in ways that send the subtle sub message "your techniques (attempts to cause you to become defensive, angry, or off-balance) are not going to work on me".* 
  2. Acknowledge - It is important that the angry person see that you understand his/her emotional state and the situation. Two major techniques to apply here are empathy and active listening.
  3. Refocus - Refocusing involves making the transition from dealing with the emotions to dealing with the actual problem.
  4. Problem-Solve - Problem-solving involves actions like getting and giving information, suggesting possibilities and appearing helpful, offering choices......... and following through.

Source: http://customerservicezone.com/faq/angercarp.htm

The next, and final method I will discuss is called "ASAP".

  1. Apologize and Acknowledge the Customer’s Feelings

    You’ll need to spend about 80% of your time smoothing the customer’s feelings and about 20% of your time working on the problem. The apology needs to be immediate. Don’t wait to apologize. If your organization fouled up, ADMIT it. And notice we’re saying “apologize,” not “I’m sorry.” I’m sorry is when you step on someone’s toes.

    A. “Ms Jackson, I apologize for the issues you’re having with your invoice.”                      

  2. Sympathize (and Empathize)

    It’s important to validate their feelings of frustration.

    Sympathy means acknowledging another person’s emotional hardships and providing comfort and assurance.

    Empathy means understanding how someone feels because you’ve experienced it also.

    A. “Ms Jackson, I apologize for the issues you’re having with your invoice.”
    S. “That’s got to be extremely frustrating.”

  3. Accept the Responsibility

    Every time you handle a customer you represent your organization. You should have the mentality that you’re 100% responsible for guiding this to a successful resolution. Accept the responsibility by re-introducing yourself. Even if you said your name earlier, this personalizes the situations and builds confidence.

    Accept the responsibility by saying:

    A. “Ms Jackson, I apologize for the issues you’re having with your invoice.”
    S. “That’s got to be extremely frustrating.”
    A. “Again, my name is Carlos and I’m here to help you resolve this.

  4. Prepare to Help

    Ask intelligent questions that will help you get to work on sorting out what’s bothering them. Demonstrate with your voice that you sincerely care about resolving this situation.

    A. “Ms Jackson, I apologize for the issues you’re having with your invoice.”
    S. “That’s got to be extremely frustrating.”
    A. “Again, my name is Carlos and I’m here to help you resolve this.”
    P. “Let’s get started and see how I’m able to help. Now please…tell me exactly what happened.”

Source: http://www.telephonedoctor.com/our_blog/asap-technique-handling-irate-customers/